Dwarf

The dwarves are masters of engineering and forgecraft, and it shows. The dwarven cities that most people get to see are wayfortresses, which are scattered across the land and form the entrances and exits to a long series of interconnected passages designed to allow for the passage of wagon trains from one wayfortress to the next. In essence these passages form a network of underground highways that make it possible for the average merchant to travel safely, easily, and with a significant amount of boredom. Of course, the dwarves do not offer this for free, but the relative lack of bandits, monsters, and weather makes it an attractive option. Of course, wayfortresses rarely exist adjacent to other races’ cities, so there’s a certain measure of risk reaching a wayfortress or getting from one to a city.

The other things worth mentioning about dwarves are the peculiarities of their nature and their cuisine. Dwarven cuisine tends towards thick stews, fried foods, lots of meats, mushrooms and unleavened bread. If there’s any sort of fruit or fresh vegetable to be found, it’s usually a concession to the limits of more delicate races’ digestive tracts. Elves in particular tend to feel nauseous or outright ill after a meal of dwarven fare, while humans find even normal portions leave them feeling overfull for many hours afterwards.

As to the nature of dwarves, one nickname for them is ‘stoneborn,’ due to the fact that when they die, rather than decaying their body will slowly transform into solid rock devoid of any recognizable features or limbs which merges with any stone they happen to be in contact with. While raise dead and similar spells can reverse this effect, it can make it difficult to distinguish between a dwarven corpse and a ‘normal’ rock. It is unknown how many boulder-strewn fields in the world are in fact ancient dwarven battlegrounds or graveyards.

Dwarf

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